30 Days of Marvel
Day #5: Your Favorite Team
The X-men
This one was obvious from the start. The X-men, and mutants in general, are very much the red-headed stepchild of the Marvel Universe. Not even celebrity teams like the Avengers, so-seemingly known for their bravery and nobility always treat the Mutant Population with as much respect as they should, despite several of their key members being mutants themselves. 

When the Morlocks were being massacred in the tunnels, where were the Avengers? Where was Spiderman? Only Thor was present, and that seemed to be more of a chance-occurrence than out of actual concern for the Morlocks.

When Genosha was obliterated, resulting in mutant Genocide, one would think that such a devastating loss of life would have caught the attention of some superhero team, right?

No. Millions died, and nobody but the X-men came in to pick up the pieces. Other heroes get lauded and praised for their efforts, they get to go on television, get to play with cool toys, and most enjoy being able to take off the cowl at the end of the day and return to an anonymous lifestyle. Mutants don’t get that. They don’t ask to be what they are, and sometimes their gifts are less than glamorous, causing them to appear quite hideous to the public resulting in even greater fear and hatred.

Though Mutant-Human relations have appeared to improved over the years, it’s really only through appearance only, very much the same way with many civil rights issues for race and sexuality here in the United States. A complete facade of acceptance that is incomplete, and sorely misrepresented. There are those who can proclaim Mutant-Human equality, but if you’re not a mutant, if you don’t have some beak growing out of your face, how can you really know what it’s like to endure the fear and hatred of others just for being born?

That’s what the X-men are for. While it was Xavier’s dream that mutants and humans live in harmony, I don’t think this will ever happen. I think there will always be that tension that waits to explode, with brief interludes of uneasy cease-fire. The X-men right now are the hope for mutantkind, for those that have been cast down, beaten and feared.

What makes this my favorite superhero team, is that they’re not even superheroes at all. They’re just people, they’re people dealing with issues of isolation, rejection, and public hatred, a fragmented race, struggling to survive in a world that fears them. There are so many story arcs about these issues, what they have to deal with, and more characters among the X-men that I relate to than any other in the Marvel Universe.

30 Days of Marvel

Day #5: Your Favorite Team

The X-men

This one was obvious from the start. The X-men, and mutants in general, are very much the red-headed stepchild of the Marvel Universe. Not even celebrity teams like the Avengers, so-seemingly known for their bravery and nobility always treat the Mutant Population with as much respect as they should, despite several of their key members being mutants themselves. 

When the Morlocks were being massacred in the tunnels, where were the Avengers? Where was Spiderman? Only Thor was present, and that seemed to be more of a chance-occurrence than out of actual concern for the Morlocks.

When Genosha was obliterated, resulting in mutant Genocide, one would think that such a devastating loss of life would have caught the attention of some superhero team, right?

No. Millions died, and nobody but the X-men came in to pick up the pieces. Other heroes get lauded and praised for their efforts, they get to go on television, get to play with cool toys, and most enjoy being able to take off the cowl at the end of the day and return to an anonymous lifestyle. Mutants don’t get that. They don’t ask to be what they are, and sometimes their gifts are less than glamorous, causing them to appear quite hideous to the public resulting in even greater fear and hatred.

Though Mutant-Human relations have appeared to improved over the years, it’s really only through appearance only, very much the same way with many civil rights issues for race and sexuality here in the United States. A complete facade of acceptance that is incomplete, and sorely misrepresented. There are those who can proclaim Mutant-Human equality, but if you’re not a mutant, if you don’t have some beak growing out of your face, how can you really know what it’s like to endure the fear and hatred of others just for being born?

That’s what the X-men are for. While it was Xavier’s dream that mutants and humans live in harmony, I don’t think this will ever happen. I think there will always be that tension that waits to explode, with brief interludes of uneasy cease-fire. The X-men right now are the hope for mutantkind, for those that have been cast down, beaten and feared.

What makes this my favorite superhero team, is that they’re not even superheroes at all. They’re just people, they’re people dealing with issues of isolation, rejection, and public hatred, a fragmented race, struggling to survive in a world that fears them. There are so many story arcs about these issues, what they have to deal with, and more characters among the X-men that I relate to than any other in the Marvel Universe.

  1. doriandawes posted this